Saturday, March 9, 2013

Freemason Thoughts # 2


What Is A Freemason?

A Freemason is a member of the world's largest fraternal organization. He not only enjoys the friendship and brotherhood of other Freemasons in his community, but also is welcomed by Freemasons anywhere in the world.
A Freemason is a man of faith, who uses tools of moral and ethical principles to serve mankind. He binds himself to like-minded men in a brother­hood that transcends all religious, ethnic, social, cultural and educational differences.
He shows the aspirations and obligations of men of good will who seek to make themselves better than they are - not better than others.
A Freemason is dedicated - he recognizes his responsibility for justice, truth, charity, honesty and integrity. Freemasons work building their lives and character, just as a carpenter works at building a house.
A Freemason believes that there is such a thing as honor, and that a man has a responsibility to act with honor in everything he does. A Freemason teaches that principle. He believes that a life not founded on honor is hollow and empty - that a man who acts without honor is less than a man.
A Freemason believes that it is not only more blessed to give than to receive, it's also more rewarding. He becomes involved with problems and needs of others because he knows it gives each of us a good feeling to help, a feeling unlike any other.
A Freemason believes that every person should strive to be a good citizen and that he has a moral duty to be true to the country in which he lives, for loyalty to one's country is essential.
He is expected to obey every lawful authority, obey the laws of the country in which he lives and promote its general welfare. In no way do these requirements interfere with a Freemason's civil right to protest and seek legislative changes by lawful means.
Freemasons and the Masonic family contribute not only their money, but also an incredible amount of time to various charities. Internationally the Masonic Family donates over three million dollars per day to various charitable works. Much of our help is given anonymously. We're not after gratitude. We're more than rewarded by that feeling which comes from knowing we have helped another person over­come some adversity, so that their life can go on.